FunOrb targeting "every demographic"

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Date & time Dec 6
Location
CHINA
Creator cathylee

Who's attending

Description

Jagex has just launched its hardcore-focused Cheap Runescape Gold website offering Java-based casual games.


Dubbed FunOrb, it has been designed with you lot in mind, apparently. And rather than go for the same demographic as everybody else, it targets a "hard-casual" or "time-pressured" gamer; someone like you who is perhaps enthusiastic about hardcore titles but has no time to invest in them.


"What we're trying to do with FunOrb is provide a far more in-depth gaming experience to appeal to a different demographic than the casual sites that are our there currently, " head developer Mark Faulkner told Eurogamer.


"It something that appeals to us, personally, as gamers. And a lot of people we talk to in the industry consider this to be a good solution to the time pressures that most people have in their everyday lives. What we're trying to do is give a service that ex-gamers - or those without the time to devote to their passion - can go to for the video gaming fix they're after. "


Membership is handled by monthly subscription (GBP 2 / EUR 2 . 50), but you can download a large portion of content for free. FunOrb gets around this by using advertising to subsidise its costs.


Jagex is actually keen to point out that it will all but remove advertisements for paying customers, though, and otherwise handle the adverts subtly and unobtrusively so as not to spoil your enjoyment.


Games range from shooters to puzzle titles, Old School RuneScape Gold and are apparently as good as the best Java titles on the market - whatever they are. You can give it a look on the official web site.


Or you can read on for our chat with Mark Faulkner about FunOrb and why exactly it would appeal to us.


Why do we need another web-based gaming portal?


Mark Faulkner: Most of the online gaming portals out there are dealing with purely a casual gamer; providing games we consider to be relatively limited in terms of their gameplay. They get around this by providing you with a lot of games. What we're trying to do with FunOrb will be provide a far more in-depth gaming experience in order to appeal to a different demographic than the casual sites that are our there currently.


What sort of evidence do you have that this will be popular?


Mark Faulkner: It something that appeals to us, personally, as gamers. And a lot of people we talk to in the industry consider this to be a good solution to the time pressures that most people have in their everyday lives. Exactly what we're trying to perform is provide a service that ex-gamers -- or those without the time to devote to their passion - can go to for the gaming fix they're after.


Where's the casual aspect in asking us to be able to sign-up and commit to a service? Could it be seen as a little self-defeating?


Tag Faulkner: The games are designed to be quite in-depth in game play, but also the sort of thing you can dip in and out of without being punished unnecessarily. Most of the games lend themselves to five or 10 minute play sessions, but on a regular basis. So if you have spare time on your lunch hour you can dip in and play : and if it's multiplayer then interact with other people online - and then leave it and come back to it the following day, without being penalised for time spent away from it.


You've said you're targeting the "hard-casual" market...


Indicate Faulkner: The term I prefer is "time-pressured gamer".


Why are these people going to use what precious time they have to seek out FunOrb rather than fire up something like Call of Duty 4 with regard to 10 or 20 minutes?


Mark Faulkner: Our games will hanker back to any retro-feel that many is going to be familiar with from their days as a hardcore gamer. They will also always remember their own progress, so they will be able to dip in and out of them very quickly.


If they want to jump into Call of Duty 4 then of course they can do that, but it is a fairly complex experience, and the best comes out of those video games when you're willing to put a bit of time into them. For our online games, you're going to get a lot of out of them regardless of how much time you put in.


It's interesting that you mention retro games; this new generation of consoles each has an online service where you can down load retro or retro-inspired titles. Do you feel like you're competing with these?


Mark Faulkner: Potentially, yes. It's an area of the marketplace that we think is on the rise. So while we may be seen as a competitor to those services, it's an ever-growing marketplace making more space for more players.


Do you see Nintendo and its "expanding the market" goal as competition?


Draw Faulkner: To a degree. But not really; not a strong competitor. We're not really aiming at the console gaming market. Anybody that can gain access to a PC rapid be they at school, in a library, in an Internet cafe or at home instructions will be able to log-in as a FunOrb customer as well as basically pick up where they left off in whatever game they were playing. It will remember exactly where they got to and they will be able to carry on as if they had never left.


It's a different kind of games experience than you would get on a console. The Wii is a social experience with you and your friends in your front room. In FunOrb it's a social experience with you and your friends no matter where they are. One of the areas the market is growing is usually reaching out to non-traditional gamers: women, families, etc . How important are they to your seemingly hardcore-focused vision?  http://www.rsgoldfast.com

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